Eads Bridge

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Eads Bridge and the Mississippi riverfront busy with horse-drawn carts
The St. Louis Bridge over the Mississippi River.

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The Mugar Memorial Library, The Internet Archive

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Description

View of Eads Bridge and the Mississippi riverfront as seen from St. Louis, showing the bank busy with horse-drawn carts, and steamboats on the water.

Eads Bridge is a trussed-arch bridge connecting St. Louis, Missouri and East St. Louis, Illinois by both road and railway. It is described as follows by the author of the related entry:

It consists of three arches, the center one of which has a span of 520 feet, and the other two of 515 feet, and each with a rise of 60 feet. There are two main piers and two abutments, the foundation of one being 120 feet under water. The arches are formed with top and bottom chords in sections of steel tubes 16 inches in diameter, composed of staves 12 feet long, banded together by steel thimbles or couplings. These top and bottom chords, 12 feet apart, are connected by a triangular system of bracing, constituting an arched truss of great strength combined with extreme lightness.

We’re assuming the engraver who worked on this plate is the same person who also contributed to Beyond the Mississippi by Albert Deane Richardson, published in Hartford, Conn. by the American Publishing Company, 1869.

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