Mound Layering

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Mound layering
Mound layering.

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Old Book Illustrations

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Layering (or layerage, sometimes marcotting) is a common plant propagation technique where an aerial stem is made to grow roots prior to detachment from the parent plant.

Natural layering occurs when a branch comes in contact with the ground and spontaneously grows roots. Horticulturists have taken advantage of this phenomenon to propagate desirable species.

Mound (or stool) layering is suitable for heavy-stemmed trees with tight branches. In the spring, the stems of a young tree are cut about 15 cm (6 inches) above the trunk, which will result in the sprouting of plenty of new buds. The following spring, soil is mounded over the young shoots growing from the buds in order for roots to develop. This technique is known to be successful with apple rootstocks, quince, daphne, magnolia, and cotoneaster.

The caption reads in the original French: Marcottage en cépée.

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