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L’Illustration, a Weekly Newspaper

L’Illustration, a weekly newspaper

L’Illustration was a weekly French newspaper created just one year after the Illustrated London News, from which its publishers drew some of their inspiration. It met with great success throughout remainder of the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth, thanks to its editorial policy offering information about the world at large and, of course, to its dedication to let illustrations play a prominent part in… View page »

On George Cruikshank

On George Cruikshank

George Cruikshank’s special merit (I leave aside all his other merits, such as subtlety of expression, intelligence of the fantastique, etc.) is an inexhaustible abundance in the grotesque. This verve is unbelievable and would be said to be impossible if we didn’t have enough evidence in the shape of a tremendous body of work, an innumerable collection of illustrations and endless series of comic albums; in short… View page »

The Ingoldsby Legends

The Ingoldsby Legends

A work illustrated by Cruikshank, Leech, and Tenniel, even if it had no intrinsic merits of its own, would stand a very fair chance of immortality; but when the three great artists combine simply to embellish what would otherwise live as long as the English language, as long as humour and pathos, exquisite versification, and singular felicity as well as facility of rhyme, are appreciated, it seems superfluous to do more than… View page »

Jean Gigoux on Gil Blas

Jean Gigoux on Gil Blas

Histoire de Gil Blas de Santillane isn’t the first illustrated French book of the Romantic era. To name only two, Légendes, ballades et fabliaux by Bahour-Lormian (1829), Nodier’s Histoire du roi de Bohême et de ses sept châteaux (1830), illustrated respectively by Achille Devéria and Tony Johannot, already incorporated plenty of in-text illustrations. They, too, relied on the technique of wood engraving… View page »

Gustave Doré

Gustave Doré

It was at the Café de L’Horloge in Paris. Mr. Whistler sat leaning on his cane, looking off into space, dreamily and wearily. He aroused enough to answer the question: “Doré—Gustave Doré—an artist? Why, the name sounds familiar! Oh, yes, an illustrator. Ah, now I understand; but there is a difference between an artist and an illustrator, you know, my boy. Doré—yes, I knew him—he had… View page »

Léon Job-Vernet

Léon Job-Vernet

Léon Job-Vernet was a painter, pastellist, and lithographer born in Paris May 11, 1830. He studied painting with Léon Cogniet (1764-1880) – who also taught Messonnier, Rosa Bonheur, Charbonnel…–and he was admitted to the Paris École des Beaux-Arts October 2, 1844. Although he seemed to be travelling a lot and, at one point, divide his life between France and the United States, he managed to exhibit at the … View page Léon Job-Vernet»

Honoré Daumier

Honoré Daumier

As we attempt, at the present day, to write the history of everything, it would be strange if we had happened to neglect the annals of caricature; for the very essence of the art of Cruikshank and Gavarni, of Daumier and Leech, is to be historical; and every one knows how addicted is this great science to discoursing about itself. Many industrious seekers, in England and France, have ascended the stream… View page »

On L’Artiste

L'Artiste

When Jules Janin wrote in L’Artiste itself the history of L’Artiste, he gave a pompous account of magazine contributors with exclamations, enthusiasm, emotion, sighs and tears for each of them. He also insisted especially on the Johannot brothers for whom he always had a soft spot (they were the illustrators of his book The Dead Donkey) and, redoubling crying he crushed them under… View page »

Frederick Sandys

Frederick Sandys

This clever artist was bom at Norwich in 1832, and educated at the Norwich Grammar School, applying himself at a very early age with earnestness to drawing and painting. He never attended the Royal Academy Schools as has been stated, and was not a pupil either of Richmond or Lawrence. Lawrence he never met but for a few minutes, and his acquaintance with Richmond was only as that of a… View page »

Frédéric de Courcy

F. de Courcy

Frédéric de Courcy was a painter, born Alexandre-Frédéric Charlot de Courcy in Paris on March 28, 1832. His father, a writer of light comedies, was also known as Frédéric de Courcy. For the record, the cast of one of his plays, Le Courrier de la Malle (The Mail Coach Agent, written with M. de Rougemont and C. Dupeuty and published in 1832), featured Henry Monnier (1799–1877), an actor … View page Frédéric de Courcy»

Émile Marcelin

Émile Marcelin

By Henri Béraldi Émile Marcelin, whose real name was Émile Planat, was born in 1825. From 1850 to 1870, he was the special cartoonist for humorous pages on stylish life in Le Journal Amusant and L’Illustration at first and later in La Vie Parisienne, which he founded. The 1860 socialites, the Opera of rue Lepelletier and Les italiens, first nights and parties, dances at the Tuileries and variety … View page Émile Marcelin»

Aventures de Robert-Robert

Les Aventures de Robert-Robert

Aventures de Robert-Robert et de son fidèle compagnon Toussaint Lavenette was written by Louis Desnoyers (1802-1868) and published, as it seems, in 1839. The first edition consisted of two volumes, containing illustrations drawn by Frédéric de Courcy and engraved in wood by Bisson. The pictures available on this site are taken from the ninth edition, published after 1860, which is in… View page »